The National Heart Clinic

Cardiac Tests & Diagnosis

The National Heart Clinic

The National Heart Clinic, located in the prestigious Harley Street, is nestled within a historical, grade II listed building. The clinic boasts a modern, state-of-the-art cardiology department equipped with the latest top-notch equipment, ensuring the highest standard of care for all patients.

A well-lit, modern office with a wooden floor, containing a desk, chairs, a sofa, wall art, and large windows with curtains.A spacious living room with hardwood floors, two large windows, elegant curtains, a chandelier, leather sofas, and a decorative fireplace.
A spacious living room with hardwood floors, two large windows, elegant curtains, a chandelier, leather sofas, and a decorative fireplace.

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Founder & Director

Dr. Francesco Lo Monaco

Winner of European Awards in Medicine 2022 - Cardiology
Fellow of The Royal Society of Medicine
Honorary Senior Clinical Lecturer at Imperial College School of Medicine (03/2013 - 05/2024)
Postdoctoral Researcher in Cardiology at New York Medical College
Specialist in Cardiology at Chelsea and Westminster NHS Trust (09/2009 - 05/2024)
Visiting Professor of Cardiology at Asia Heart Hospital, Wuhan, China
International Lecturer in Echocardiography
Medical Director and Founder of Harley Street International Polyclinic
Royal College of Physicians Associate Member
British Medical Association Member
The National Heart Clinic Founder & Medical Director

Cardiac Tests

Our state-of-the-art diagnostics ensure a thorough examination, providing valuable insights for a proactive approach to your heart health. Take control of your well-being and schedule your cardiac tests today.

Conditions We Treat

An illustration of a human heart glowing in blue with red arteries and veins. The heart is displayed against a dark background, highlighting its intricate network of blood vessels. The image is detailed, emphasizing the heart's anatomical structure.

High Blood Pressure

Two medical professionals in scrubs are examining a heart model and a medical chart on a clipboard. One holds the heart model while the other points to details on it using a pointer. The clipboard displays an anatomical study of the human body.

High Cholesterol

A person holds a detailed anatomical model of a human heart in one hand and a magnifying glass in the other, closely examining the heart model against a blue background.

Valvular Heart Disease

An angiogram image showing the coronary arteries of the heart with a faint EKG strip at the bottom. The arteries appear filled with contrast dye, which highlights their structure and any blockages or abnormalities present.

Coronary Artery Disease

A man wearing a denim shirt is sitting on a couch holding a brown mug in his left hand. His right hand is on his chest, and he has a pained expression on his face, indicating discomfort or chest pain. The background is a bright, modern living space.

Irregular Heart Beat

About The Tests

Electrocardiogram (ECG)

An Electrocardiogram (ECG) is a type of cardiac test that measures the heart rhythm and the electrical activity of the heart. It is anon-invasive, painless test that measures the electrical signals in your heart and instantaneously shows its electrical activity. Naturally occurring electrical signals coordinate the contractions in different parts of your heart. The electrical impulses are formed in the sinus node (SAN), which is located in the right atrium of your heart. The sinus node is known as the heart’s natural pacemaker.

A flat lay image showing medical items, including a black stethoscope, an electrocardiogram (ECG) printout with heart activity readings, a tablet with a blank screen, and several MRI or X-ray scans placed on a white surface.

What is an Electrocardiogram (ECG)?

An Electrocardiogram is a medical test that records the electrical activity of the heart over a period of time. This recorded data is presented in the form of a graph or waveform, allowing healthcare professionals to assess the heart’s rhythm and detect any irregularities. By examining the ECG, doctors can diagnose various cardiac conditions, such as arrhythmias, myocardial infarctions (heart attacks), and more.

How Does an ECG Work?

During an ECG, small electrodes are attached to specific locations on the skin’s surface, typically on the chest, arms, and legs. These electrodes are connected to a machine that records the electrical signals generated by the heart. The test is painless and takes only a few minutes to complete.

Interpreting the ECG The resulting ECG graph consists of multiple waveforms, each representing different aspects of the heart’s electrical activity. The most recognisable of these is the “PQRST” complex:

P-Wave:

Represents atrial depolarization, which indicates the contraction of the atria (upper chambers of the heart).

QRS Complex:

Depicts ventricular depolarization, indicating the contraction of the ventricles (lower chambers of the heart).

T-Wave:

Represents ventricular repolarization, indicating the relaxation phase of the ventricles.

The intervals, shapes, and sizes of these waves provide crucial information about the heart’s health. For example, a prolonged QRS complex may indicate a blockage in the heart’s electrical pathways, whilst abnormal T-waves can suggest potential cardiac issues.

Why are ECGs Important?

ECGs play a pivotal role in diagnosing and monitoring various heart conditions, including:

Arrhythmias:

Irregular heart rhythms, such as atrial fibrillation or bradycardia, can be detected and managed through ECGs.

Myocardial Infarction (Heart Attack):

ECGs help identify the presence of a heart attack by revealing characteristic changes in the wave form.

Heart Diseases:

ECGs assist in diagnosing heart diseases like cardiomyopathy and congenital heart defects. Electrolyte Imbalances: Abnormal ECG patterns can signal electrolyte imbalances, such as potassium or calcium deficiencies. Medication Monitoring: ECGs are used to monitor the effects of medications on the heart, ensuring patient safety.

Types of ECGs:

Several types of ECGs cater to specific diagnostic needs: Resting ECG: The standard ECG taken while the patient is at rest, typically performed in a clinic or hospital setting

Holter Monitor:

A portable ECG device worn by the patient for an extended period, usually 24 to 48 hours, to record heart activity during daily activities.

Stress Test:

Combines ECG with exercise to evaluate the heart’s performance under stress, helping diagnose coronary artery disease.

Echocardiogram (Heart Echo Scan)

An echocardiogram, also known as an echo, is a type of ultrasound scan that looks at the heart muscle, chambers and valves. Using a probe, high-frequency sound waves are sent into the patient’s heart. These sound waves bounce off different parts of the heart and surrounding areas and create a moving picture of the heart valves and chambers.

A person lying down with a medical professional performing an ultrasound. The ultrasound screen is visible in the background showing the scan results. The focus is on the professional's hand and the equipment rather than the patient's face.
Type image caption here (optional)

Understanding How It Works:

During an echocardiogram, a skilled technician, known as a sonographer, places a transducer device on the chest. This transducer emits high-frequency sound waves, which bounce off the heart’s structures, creating real-time images displayed on a monitor. These images allow healthcare professionals to evaluate the heart’s chambers, valves, walls, and blood flow patterns.

Types of Echocardiograms:

There are several types of echocardiograms, each serving different purposes:

Transthoracic Echocardiogram (TTE):

This is the most common type, performed by placing the transducer on the chest wall. It provides a comprehensive view of the heart’s overall health.

Transoesophageal Echocardiogram (TEE):

In this type, a specialized probe is passed through the mouth into the esophagus, offering clearer images of the heart’s structures, especially when a more detailed view is necessary.

Stress Echocardiogram:

This variation involves an echocardiogram before and after exercise (or using medication to simulate exercise) to assess how the heart functions under stress.

What to Expect During the Test:

The echocardiogram is painless and typically lasts between 20 to 60 minutes, depending on the type and complexity. Patients usually lie on their left side while the technician applies gel to the chest area to enhance the sound wave transmission. The technician moves the transducer across different areas of the chest to obtain various views of the heart.

Why It’s Done:

An echocardiogram helps in diagnosing or monitoring various heart conditions, including:

Assessing heart valve diseases

Detecting abnormalities in heart muscle function or thickness

Evaluating congenital heart defects

Identifying blood clots or masses within the heart

Assessing the overall pumping function of the heart (ejection fraction)

Benefits and Safety:

This test is non-invasive, has no known risks or side effects, and provides valuable information without the use of radiation. It is safe for patients of all ages, including pregnant women.

After the Test:

Once the echocardiogram is complete, a cardiologist interprets the images and prepares a report for the referring physician. The results help guide treatment decisions and ongoing management of heart conditions.

24 hour ECG Monitor

A 24-Hour ECG Holter Monitor, commonly known as a Holter monitor, is a vital diagnostic tool in cardiology. This portable device continuously records the electrical activity of the heart over an extended period, typically 24 hours. It plays a crucial role in monitoring and diagnosing various cardiac conditions.

Five small white and blue wearable medical sensors are arranged on a beige fabric surface. Each sensor has a circular shape with four white adhesive pads extending from the edges.

How Does a 24-Hour ECG Holter Monitor Work?

The 24-Hour ECG Holter Monitor consists of electrodes placed on the patient’s chest, connected to a small, portable device. The patient wears this monitor throughout the day while carrying out their usual activities. It continuously records the heart’s electrical activity, capturing data that is later analysed by healthcare professionals.

Interpreting the 24-Hour ECG Holter Monitor The data collected by the Holter monitor is carefully examined to assess the heart’s electrical patterns. Key aspects include:

Heart Rate Variability:

Changes in heart rate and rhythm over a 24-hour period are analysed.

Arrhythmias:

The monitor can detect and document irregular heart rhythms or arrhythmias.

ST-Segment Changes:

Variations in the ST-segment can indicate myocardial ischemia or reduced blood flow to the heart muscle.

Symptoms Correlation:

Patients may be asked to note any symptoms they experience during the monitoring period, helping to correlate symptoms with ECG findings.

Why is a 24-Hour ECG Holter Monitor Important?

The 24-Hour ECG Holter Monitor serves several crucial purposes in cardiology:

Detection of Arrhythmias:

It is highly effective in identifying irregular heart rhythms that may be missed during a standard ECG.

Assessment of Symptoms:

It helps determine if symptoms such as palpitations, dizziness, or fainting episodes are related to cardiac issues.

Evaluation of Treatment:

The monitor assesses the effectiveness of medications or treatments for arrhythmias or other heart conditions.

Risk Stratification:

It aids in assessing the risk of future cardiac events in patients with known heart disease.

Exercise Tolerance Test (ETT)

An exercise tolerance test (ETT) is an important diagnostic and prognostic cardiac test. It is a type of electrocardiogram (ECG) test that is used to assess the electrical activity of your heart while you are under physiological stress. Often called an exercise ECG or a stress test, an ETT measures your heart rate, your heart rhythm and the electrical activity of your heart, while you are exerting yourself.

A man wearing multiple electrode patches on his chest is exercising on a stationary bike. A healthcare professional is taking his blood pressure using a cuff and gauge. The focus is on the cardiovascular examination in a clinical setting.

What is an Exercise Tolerance Test?

An Exercise Tolerance Test, often referred to as a stress test or exercise ECG, is a valuable medical procedure used to evaluate how well the heart responds to physical activity. This diagnostic test is particularly useful in assessing the heart’s performance, detecting cardiac abnormalities, and determining exercise tolerance.

How Does an Exercise Tolerance Test Work?

During an Exercise Tolerance Test, patients are typically asked to walk on a treadmill or pedal a stationary bicycle while their heart activity is monitored. The test begins at a low intensity and gradually increases in difficulty. Throughout the test, vital signs, such as heart rate, blood pressure, and electrocardiogram (ECG) readings, are continuously recorded.

Interpreting the Exercise Tolerance Test:

The results of the test are carefully analysed to assess the heart’s response to exercise. Key aspects that are considered include:

Heart Rate:

Monitoring how the heart rate increases during exercise provides insight into its ability to respond to increased demand.

Blood Pressure:

Changes in blood pressure levels are evaluated to determine how well the circulatory system adapts to physical activity.

ECG Changes:

The ECG graph may reveal abnormalities, such as arrhythmias or changes in the ST-segment, which can indicate ischemia or inadequate blood flow to the heart muscle.

Symptoms:

Patient-reported symptoms like chest pain, shortness of breath, or fatigue are taken into account.

Why is an Exercise Tolerance Test Important?

The Exercise Tolerance Test serves several essential purposes in cardiology:

Detection of Coronary Artery Disease (CAD):

It helps identify blockages or narrowing of coronary arteries, which can lead to chest pain (angina) and heart attacks.

Assessment of Exercise Capacity:

It provides information on an individual’s ability to tolerate physical activity and can be useful for developing exercise programs.

Evaluation of Cardiac Medications:

The test can determine the effectiveness of medications in controlling heart conditions.

Risk Stratification:

It assists in assessing the risk of future cardiac events in individuals with known heart disease.‍

In summary, an Exercise Tolerance Test is a valuable diagnostic tool that assesses the heart’s response to physical activity. By monitoring vital signs and ECG changes during exercise, it helps identify cardiac abnormalities and plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and management of heart conditions. Understanding the significance and process of this test is essential for comprehensive cardiac evaluation.

Exercise Stress Echocardiogram

Exercise stress echocardiogram is a valuable diagnostic tool in cardiology that combines echocardiography with physical exercise. This procedure assesses the heart’s function and detects potential cardiac issues by capturing real-time images of the heart’s response to stress.

A clean, bright room with exercise equipment, including a stationary bike and a treadmill. The room has white walls, large windows with sheer curtains, a mirror, and framed certificates on the walls. A beige cushioned bench sits along one wall.

How Does a exercise Stress Echo Work?

The exercise Stress Echo begins with an echocardiogram at rest to establish a baseline assessment of the heart’s function. The patient then exercises on a treadmill or cycles while being closely monitored. As exercise intensity increases, the echocardiography continues to capture images of the heart’s response.


How Does an Exercise Tolerance Test Work?

During an Exercise Tolerance Test, patients are typically asked to walk on a treadmill or pedal a stationary bicycle while their heart activity is monitored. The test begins at a low intensity and gradually increases in difficulty. Throughout the test, vital signs, such as heart rate, blood pressure, and electrocardiogram (ECG) readings, are continuously recorded.

Interpreting the Exercise Stress Echo:

Results are analysed by evaluating changes in the heart’s structure and function during exercise, including:


Wall motion abnormalities

Heart rate and blood pressure changes

Ejection fraction to assess pumping efficiency

Valve function evaluation

Why is a Exercise Stress Echo Important?

A Exercise Stress Echo is essential for diagnosing various heart conditions, such as coronary artery disease, heart valve abnormalities, cardiomyopathies, and exercise-induced arrhythmias.

It also helps monitor treatment effectiveness for cardiac conditions.

In summary, a Exercise Stress Echo is a powerful diagnostic tool that assesses the heart’s function and detects cardiac abnormalities through a combination of echocardiography and exercise. Understanding its significance and methodology is crucial for comprehensive cardiac evaluation.

24 h Blood Pressure Monitor

A 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitor is a portable device used to measure blood pressure continuously over a 24-hour period. It consists of a cuff that is worn around the upper arm and connected to a small recording device. The monitor automatically inflates the cuff at regular intervals, usually every 30 minutes, to measure the blood pressure.

A close-up image of a sphygmomanometer, commonly known as a blood pressure monitor. The device includes an analog dial gauge showing pressure readings, a black tube, and a dark blue cuff used for wrapping around the patient's arm to measure blood pressure.

This device is important in diagnosing hypertension, or high blood pressure, because it provides a more comprehensive and accurate assessment of an individual’s blood pressure patterns throughout the day and night. Traditional blood pressure measurements taken in a doctor’s office may not always reflect a person’s true blood pressure levels, as they can be influenced by “white coat syndrome” or temporary anxiety.

By using a 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitor, doctors can obtain a complete picture of a person’s blood pressure fluctuations during their daily activities, including during sleep. This information helps in identifying any abnormal blood pressure patterns, such as elevated blood pressure during certain times of the day or night, which may go unnoticed in regular office measurements.

Accurate diagnosis of hypertension is crucial for effective management and treatment. The 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitor helps healthcare professionals make more informed decisions regarding medication adjustments, lifestyle modifications, and overall cardiovascular risk assessment. It allows for a more personalized approach to managing hypertension, leading to better health outcomes for patients.

Cardiac CT

Cardiac CT, or Computed Tomography, is an advanced medical imaging technique used to visualise the heart and blood vessels. This non-invasive diagnostic test provides detailed, three-dimensional images of the heart’s anatomy and blood flow, enabling healthcare professionals to assess cardiac health, diagnose various heart conditions, and plan appropriate treatments.

3D rendered image of a human heart showing detailed anatomical structures. The heart appears in red with intricate visible blood vessels. Various measurement scales and indicators are present on the sides and bottom of the image, along with an ECG trace in the lower left corner.

How Does Cardiac CT Work?

During a Cardiac CT scan, the patient lies on a table that is slowly moved into a large, doughnut-shaped machine called a CT scanner. The scanner emits a series of X-ray beams, and detectors on the opposite side of the machine measure the amount of radiation that passes through the body. A computer processes this information to create detailed cross-sectional images (slices) of the heart and surrounding blood vessels. Contrast dye may be injected into a vein to enhance image quality and highlight blood vessels.

How Does Cardiac CT Work?

During a Cardiac CT scan, the patient lies on a table that is slowly moved into a large, doughnut-shaped machine called a CT scanner. The scanner emits a series of X-ray beams, and detectors on the opposite side of the machine measure the amount of radiation that passes through the body. A computer processes this information to create detailed cross-sectional images (slices) of the heart and surrounding blood vessels. Contrast dye may be injected into a vein to enhance image quality and highlight blood vessels.

Interpreting Cardiac CT Findings, Cardiac CT provides valuable information, including:

Coronary Artery Assessment:

The scan can detect narrowing or blockages in the coronary arteries, indicating coronary artery disease (CAD).

Heart Structure:

It offers detailed images of the heart’s chambers, valves, and overall structure.

Calcium Scoring:

Cardiac CT can quantify the amount of calcium deposits in coronary arteries, which is a risk factor for CAD.

Tumour Detection:

It can identify tumours or abnormalities in the heart.

Aortic Assessment:

The test evaluates the aorta, detecting conditions like aortic aneurysms or dissections.

Why is Cardiac CT Important?

Cardiac CT is essential for various reasons:

Early Diagnosis:

It helps in early detection and diagnosis of heart conditions, allowing for prompt intervention.

Risk Assessment:

The scan is used to assess an individual’s risk of heart disease, especially in patients with risk factors like high blood pressure or family history.

Treatment Planning:

Detailed images aid in planning surgeries, interventions, or treatments.

Monitoring:

Cardiac CT can monitor the progression of heart conditions and the effectiveness of treatments over time.

Types of Cardiac CTT

here are different types of Cardiac CT scans, including:

Coronary CT Angiography (CCTA):

Focuses on the coronary arteries to assess for blockages or stenosis.

Cardiac CT Calcium Scoring:

Quantifies coronary artery calcium to estimate the risk of CAD.

Cardiac CT for Structural Assessment:

Used to evaluate heart valves, chambers, and congenital abnormalities.

Cardiac MRI

Cardiac MRI, or Magnetic Resonance Imaging, is an advanced medical imaging technique that provides detailed and non-invasive visualisation of the heart and its surrounding structures. This sophisticated diagnostic test utilises powerful magnets and radio waves to generate high-resolution images of the heart, offering valuable insights into cardiac anatomy, function, and blood flow.

A patient lies on a bed next to a CT scanner, with a medical professional standing adjacent, smiling and placing a hand on the patient's shoulder. The setting appears to be a modern medical examination room.

How Does Cardiac MRI Work?

During a Cardiac MRI, the patient lies comfortably within a large, tunnel-shaped MRI scanner. The scanner generates a strong magnetic field, causing the hydrogen nuclei in the body’s tissues, including the heart, to align. Radio waves are then applied, causing these nuclei to emit signals. A computer processes these signals to create precise, multi-dimensional images of the heart, including its chambers, valves, blood vessels, and surrounding tissues.

Interpreting Cardiac MRI Findings, Cardiac MRI provides a wealth of information, including:

Cardiac Function:

It offers detailed images of the heart’s size, shape, and function, including ejection fraction (pumping efficiency).

Myocardial Viability:

Cardiac MRI can assess areas of heart muscle damage or viability, crucial for diagnosing heart attacks or cardiomyopathies.

Blood Flow:

The test can evaluate blood flow patterns, detect obstructions, and assess the impact on heart function.

Valve Function:

Cardiac MRI visualises heart valve structure and function, including regurgitation or stenosis.

Pericardium and Great Vessels:

It examines the pericardium (membrane surrounding the heart) and the great vessels (aorta and pulmonary artery).

Why is Cardiac MRI Important?

Cardiac MRI serves several essential purposes in cardiology:

Accurate Diagnosis:

It provides highly detailed images for precise diagnosis of various heart conditions, including coronary artery disease, cardiomyopathies, congenital heart defects, and valvular diseases.

Treatment Planning:

Cardiac MRI guides medical professionals in planning surgeries, interventions, or treatments.

Risk Assessment:

The scan helps assess an individual’s risk of heart disease and can monitor disease progression or response to treatment.

Non-Invasive Evaluation:

Unlike some other imaging methods, Cardiac MRI is non-invasive and does not use ionising radiation, making it safe for repeated use.

Types of Cardiac MRI:

There are different types of Cardiac MRI studies, including:

Cine MRI:

This type captures dynamic images of the beating heart to assess cardiac function.

Late Gadolinium Enhancement (LGE):

LGE MRI identifies areas of heart muscle damage, fibrosis, or scarring.

Stress Cardiac MRI:

It evaluates the heart’s response to stress (such as exercise or medication) to detect coronary artery disease.

Carotid Doppler

A Carotid Ultrasound, also known as a carotid duplex or Doppler ultrasound, is a non-invasive diagnostic test used to evaluate the carotid arteries in the neck. These arteries supply blood to the brain, making the test vital for assessing the risk of stroke and other vascular conditions.

A woman is lying on an examination table, receiving an ultrasound on her neck. A medical professional is operating the ultrasound probe, while medical equipment is visible in the foreground. The setting appears to be a medical clinic or hospital.

How Does a Carotid Ultrasound Work?

During a Carotid Ultrasound, a transducer (a small handheld device) is placed on the skin over the carotid arteries. The transducer emits high-frequency sound waves that bounce off the blood vessels and create images on a screen. Doppler technology is used to assess blood flow through the arteries, and any blockages or abnormalities can be detected.

Interpreting Carotid Ultrasound Findings, Carotid Doppler provides valuable information, including:

Plaque Build-up:

It can reveal the presence of atherosclerotic plaques, which are fatty deposits that can narrow the carotid arteries and increase the risk of stroke.

Blood Flow:

Doppler measurements help assess blood flow velocity and detect any turbulence or restrictions.

Stenosis:

The test can determine the degree of stenosis (narrowing) in the carotid arteries, which is crucial for risk assessment.

Thrombosis:

Blood clots within the carotid arteries can be visualized.

Why is a Carotid Ultrasound Important?

A Carotid Ultrasound serves several essential purposes in vascular health:

Stroke Risk Assessment:

It helps identify individuals at risk of stroke due to carotid artery disease.

Vascular Disease Detection:

The test aids in detecting atherosclerosis, a common cause of stroke and other vascular conditions.

Treatment Planning:

The findings guide medical professionals in determining the most appropriate treatment, such as medication, lifestyle changes, or surgery.

Monitoring Progress:

Carotid Ultrasound can be used to track changes in plaque size and blood flow over time.

Types of Carotid Ultrasound :

There are different types of Carotid Ultrasound exams, including:

Carotid Duplex Ultrasound:

Combines traditional ultrasound with Doppler ultrasound to provide detailed images and blood flow measurements.

Colour Doppler Ultrasound:

Utilizes colour-coded images to highlight blood flow direction and velocity.

Transcranial Doppler Ultrasound:

Focuses on the blood flow within the brain’s blood vessels, often used in stroke risk assessment.

Arterial & Venous Doppler

Arterial & Venous Ultrasound, often referred to as a vascular ultrasound or duplex ultrasound, is a non-invasive diagnostic test used to assess the blood flow in arteries and veins throughout the body. This valuable imaging technique provides detailed information about the circulatory system and helps diagnose various vascular conditions.

A person lying on a blue medical examination table has their lower leg scanned with an ultrasound device by a gloved healthcare professional. The ultrasound machine with various buttons and controls is in the foreground.

How Does an Arterial & Venous Ultrasound Work?

During an Arterial & Venous Ultrasound, a trained technologist or sonographer uses a handheld device called a transducer to send high-frequency sound waves into the body’s tissues. These sound waves bounce off the blood vessels and are translated into real-time images on a screen. The test is painless and does not require radiation or contrast agents.

Interpreting Arterial & Venous Ultrasound Findings Arterial & Venous Ultrasound provides crucial information, including:

Blood Flow:

The test assesses the direction and velocity of blood flow in arteries and veins.

Blood Clots:

It can detect the presence of blood clots (thrombosis) within veins, a condition known as deep vein thrombosis (DVT).

Stenosis:

Narrowing of arteries or veins can be identified, which is important for diagnosing conditions like peripheral artery disease (PAD).

Aneurysms:

Abnormal dilations of blood vessels (aneurysms) can be visualized.

Plaque Build-up:

The test can reveal the presence of atherosclerotic plaques in arteries.

Why is Arterial & Venous Ultrasound Important?

Arterial & Venous Ultrasound serves several vital purposes in vascular health:

Diagnosis:

It helps diagnose conditions such as DVT, PAD, varicose veins, and aneurysms.

Treatment Planning:

The findings guide medical professionals in determining the most appropriate treatment, whether it be medication, minimally invasive procedures, or surgery.

Vascular Disease Monitoring:

The test can track changes in blood flow, plaque size, and the progression of vascular diseases over time.

Screening:

Arterial & Venous Ultrasound is used as a screening tool for individuals at risk of vascular diseases, such as those with diabetes or a family history of vascular conditions.

Types of Arterial & Venous Ultrasound:

There are different types of Arterial & Venous Ultrasound exams, including:

Carotid Duplex Ultrasound:

Focuses on the carotid arteries in the neck.

Peripheral Arterial Ultrasound:

Evaluates blood flow in the arteries of the limbs.

Venous Ultrasound:

Primarily examines veins to diagnose conditions like DVT and chronic venous insufficiency.

Abdominal Aortic Ultrasound:

Concentrates on the aorta and its branches in the abdomen.

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29 Weymouth Street, W1G 7DB, London
69 Harley Street, W1G 8QW, London

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